Project: Retro Rewind

Now that I’ve completed all the games on my 64-bit Generation playlist, I’m excited to announce a new project. Before I dive into what is, for the lack of a better term, the “128-bit era”, I’m going to take some time to do a bit of a refresher on some of the generations I’ve already covered on this site.

In one of my very first posts, I lamented about my experiences as a child with various arcade games. Having been born in 1978, I grew up in the golden age of video games. The first video game I ever had the pleasure of playing was the arcade version of Centipede. The local Pizza Hut had one and I remember being seduced by the flashing lights and hypnotic sounds. Then, by the time I was in the first or second grade, my parents got tired of all my begging and pleading and finally brought home an Atari 2600 console. And as they say, the rest was history.

As I mentioned above, I briefly touched on this in some of the earliest posts on this site. But instead of discussing the Atari-era at great length, I jumped right into my NES playthroughs. So, what I’m going do is “rewind” the discussion on this site for a bit. I’m going to go back and revisit each of the classic retro consoles. For the systems I didn’t talk about the first time around, I’m going to discuss some of their most iconic titles. This means I’m going to be taking a a closer look at the Atari 2600 and the Sega Genesis, for example. For consoles that I did discuss, I’m going to be digging up some of the more obscure, but still classic titles. I’m going to do the same with some of the classic PC games that neglected to mention.

I’m also going to discuss how players today can best experience these retro classics. I feel that the time is right for this discussion. At the time I started this blog in 2012, retro gaming was still something that only us old grognards seemed to care about. Now, it has reached the mainstream.  Retro console reissues like the NES Classic and the Atari Flashback are flying off the shelves. Collected works like the Mega Man Legacy Collection are seeing the light of day all the time.

I’m going to take a brief pause from the backlog to discuss some of this, before resuming my regular routine. Stay tuned!

A Night of Retro-Gaming

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After making my inital post, my curiosity was nudged a bit regarding the availability of old classic titles on modern systems. A while back I purchased the classic Gauntlet from the Xbox Live Arcade, so I knew that such titles were available. Interestingly enough, Gauntlet and other Midway titles seem to have been pulled from Xbox Live, but I did manage to find a few good classics for sale.

For only 400 points apiece, I snagged copies of both Asteroids/Asteroids Deluxe and Centipede/Millipede. The download comes with the titles both in their classic versions as well as new and enhanced graphics. However, aside from the visual changes, the games remain untouched.

It goes without saying that old coin-op style games are much more difficult than most modern day titles. This degree of difficulty was a big turn off for my eight-year-old son. Although, he did find the base simplicity of each game to be a bit appealing.

It’s a safe bet that these classics are not going get much playtime from him, the world of gaming has changed a great deal, and titles such as these are just not on the radar of most younger gamers these days. In reality, they are technically even “before my time”. But I must admit, there is still something magical about them. I was up until 2:00am playing Asteroids the other night, despite not making it past the third or fourth wave.

If you haven’t already guessed, I’m a sucker for nostalgia. I remember playing an arcade table Asteroids machine back during summer camp of my 3rd grade/4th grade year. Now, I could just find a similar version of Pitfall or Moon Patrol.